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healthcare.gov opens at midnight on the day of the government shutdown and lambert finds a bug

[And if you have your own experiences to share, and especially screen dumps, please add them in comments or contact me. Either Federal Exchanges, or state exchanges. I'm especially interested in Covered California! Thank you! --lambert]

Nice timing.

john.smith@gmail.com from Maine had a registration #FAIL at step 3. Here's the screen dump:

Read more about healthcare.gov opens at midnight on the day of the government shutdown and lambert finds a bug

With The 12-Point Platform, this won't happen: An aristocracy of credentialism in the 20%

This paper, or pre-draft, or sketch, or whatever it is, started out with this title: "With The 12-Point Platform, this won't happen: An aristocracy of credentialism in the 20%." But then I realized I'd gotten in deeper than I thought -- one of those posts were the framework and the notes overwhelm the original idea -- and as it turns out its more noodling on set membership functions and identity politics. Nevertheless, the starting point is education, even if we end up somewhere else.

Except not! The post is too long, so I'm going to change my mind, and return to my original plan!

* * *

Previously we've urged this definition of conservatism:

What Is Conservatism and What Is Wrong with It?

Q: What is conservatism?

A: Conservatism is the domination of society by an aristocracy.

Q: What is wrong with conservatism?

A: Conservatism is incompatible with democracy, prosperity, and civilization in general. It is a destructive system of inequality and prejudice that is founded on deception and has no place in the modern world.

(The relationship or overlap between conservatism and neo-liberalism is a topic for another day.) Now, in the 20%, we can see an aristocracy developing based not on dynastic wealth, but by credentialled families and clans in the 20%. The Economist writes: Read more about With The 12-Point Platform, this won't happen: An aristocracy of credentialism in the 20%

With The 12-Point Platform, this won't happen: Conrad Hughes Hilton III strutting around like The Compleat Asshole he has grown up to be

In the 12-Point Platform we advocate:

3. Tax the Rich

and we have also urged that one good reason for a steeply progressive effective tax rate is "for the psychological and spiritual well-being of the children of the rich themselves." Conrad Hughes Hilton III is one person who would clearly have benefited from the 12-Point Platform. He's an asshole, to be sure, but he's clearly troubled, and his family's inherited wealth is clearly part of the problem.

I'll spare you most of the detail on Paris Hilton's truly world-class in-flight meltdown, but here are some of the highlights. From NBC: Read more about With The 12-Point Platform, this won't happen: Conrad Hughes Hilton III strutting around like The Compleat Asshole he has grown up to be

With The 12-Point Platform, this won't happen: Handing over weapons caches to ticked-off locals who want to kill us

Via Nippersdad, the Guardian:

Chaos in Yemen has left the US military unable to monitor the vast arsenal it has spent years providing to its Yemeni counterpart.

To end the wars, end blowback. To end blowback, dismantle the self-licking ice cream cones

Given that the 12-Point Platform has this plank:

10. End the Wars

I've come to the conclusion, with a sense of dawning horror, that I actually have to develop some views on defense policy.* Which is complicated. However, since we're now entering the budget season, it seems natural to take a look at the defense budget. And leaving aside from squillion-dollar anecdotes, like the F-35 boondoggle, what seems really remarkable, to my naive eye, is that the Pentagon doesn't actually know what it's sending that trillion dollar budget on. In contrast, Obama just decided to publish yearly physican payment data under Medicare. OK, fine, but how come the Pentagon gets a pass when it comes to "yearly contractor payment data," anyhow?** Seems like a double standard...) Foreign Policy:

The Pentagon has never been audited, despite having a budget larger than any other federal agency anywhere in the world. Despite a coalition spanning Ralph Nader to Grover Norquist, the agency has resisted the fiscal accountability requirements imposed by law on every other branch of the government. The Defense Department has for years slow-rolled demands to get its books in order, though now claims to be on the verge of readiness to have independent auditors come in to inspect and validate its accounts. But signs of dysfunction, waste, and corruption persist, and a complete audit during the next two years is not guaranteed.

"Never been audited." What could go wrong? Read more about To end the wars, end blowback. To end blowback, dismantle the self-licking ice cream cones

With The 12-Point Platform, this won't happen: Troops in Syria

I'm starting to sense a consensus congealing:

Lindsay Graham:

Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.), who is considering a 2016 presidential bid, said on Sunday it would require 10,000 American "boots on the ground" to stop the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) in Syria.

Coalition airstrikes in Iraq and Syria won't destroy the group, but do help in some regard, Graham said on CBS's "Face the Nation."

Yet more noodling on intersectionality (the 1%, the 20%, and the 80%)

Last post we developed a notation for classifying or categorizing people into classes (sets) using a set membership function; because it's so ubiquitous, we translated "white working class male" into an instance of the set membership function f(x; R, C, G) by "filling in the blanks" (parameters) for R (race), C (class) and G (gender) for our individual person, "J," thus: f(x; "white", "80%", "male") . Read more about Yet more noodling on intersectionality (the 1%, the 20%, and the 80%)

With The 12-Point Platform, this won't happen: Humongous boondoggle weapons systems

Daily Beast:

New U.S. Stealth Jet Can’t Fire Its Gun Until 2019
The Pentagon’s newest stealth jet, the nearly $400 billion Joint Strike Fighter, won’t be able to fire its gun during operational missions until 2019, three to four years after it becomes operational.

Of course, the Air Force is trying to get rid of the A10 Warthog, which can fire a gun, with the F35. Read more about With The 12-Point Platform, this won't happen: Humongous boondoggle weapons systems

With The 12-Point Platform, this won't happen: Marijuana arrests. Take that, Loretta Lynch!

When in the 12-Point Platform we say:

#10: End the Wars

we mean all the wars, including the so-called War on Terror, and the so-called War on Drugs; all the self-licking ice cream cones. (Ending the War on Drugs, besides sparing many thousands of citizens from having an arrest on their permanent record, would also strike major blows at the streams of rental extraction controlled by the prison-industrial complex and the surveillance state.) Read more about With The 12-Point Platform, this won't happen: Marijuana arrests. Take that, Loretta Lynch!

More noodling on intersectionality (more on the 1%, the 20%, and the 80%)

[UPDATE I realized I left the legend off Figure 2, so the colors in the Venn Diagram must have seemed random. They're pretty random anyhow, since in order to get the color to blend properly, I had to use beige to mean white, which is another instance of the fact that developing a sense of visualization and a visual vocabulary isn't all that easy. Anyway, if (a) anybody read this, and (b) reading it, found Figure 2 to be the source of bafflement, Figure 2 is improved. --lambert]

Some may think this series (part one) is dry.... To which I would respond so is the edge of a sword, until it's used....

If we think of the 80/20/1 as sets of people (classes), how do we figure out how to put one person in one set, and another in another?

Informally we might say with a litmus test: In the case before us, one litmus test is whether they purchase labor power (the 1%) or sell it (the 99%, with other litmus tests to classify the "pillars of the regime" into the 20% from the 80%)[1]. More formally, we might say, for "litmus test," "set membership function," as we see in Figure 1. And as you can see, I'm still learning to sketch (and might even have to give up, or learn both to draw, and especially to print and/or write, better): Read more about More noodling on intersectionality (more on the 1%, the 20%, and the 80%)

With The 12-Point Platform, this won't happen: College students sleeping in their cars to avoid debt

This story from 2014 made my blood boil. Here it is again:

Josiah Corbin spent a lot of weeknights over the past four years sleeping in his car in a Walmart parking lot.

Thanks in part to his routine, the 23-year-old will graduate from the University of Maine with a biology degree, and without debt, on Saturday.

Corbin, a fifth-year student who took his last exam Thursday, got a work-study job in his second year of school that kept him on campus late — sometimes past midnight. His family’s Dover-Foxcroft home is about an hour drive from the UMaine campus. Once he decided on a science major, he found many of his required classes were only available at 8 a.m., which meant very little sleep, especially when he had to factor in drive time and studying.

Corbin didn’t get as much financial aid as he hoped and didn’t want to incur student debt over his next four years of school. So he made an unusual decision — hunker down in the car.

He started out sleeping in a parking lot near Alfond Arena on campus, curling up in his car, a rusted-out 1987 Toyota Corolla. By pulling out his front passenger’s seat, he was able to lay down a small “mattress,” which isn’t much more than a body pillow. By wrapping up in a couple of sleeping bags, he was able to make himself “relatively cozy.”

After a few weeks in a UMaine parking lot, police found Corbin in his car late one night and told him he couldn’t sleep in his vehicle there. So Corbin relocated to Walmart in Bangor, which has a relatively steady population of overnight sleepers, according to Corbin. Some come in recreational vehicles, others in their cars. A surprising number of them, especially in warmer months, are from Canada, he said.

Walmart policy allows recreational vehicles to park in its lots as space allows, but the policy doesn’t say anything about people sleeping in cars. Walmart says on its website that sleepover policies and regulations largely are up to individual stores and local laws. Corbin said no one from Walmart ever bothered him about sleeping there overnight in his car.

Corbin estimates he probably saved about $8,000 per year avoiding room-and-board costs, avoiding a meal plan and cutting down his commute. That works out to $32,000 through the course of his college career, most of which he would have needed loans to cover.

Tell me its not a great country! Read more about With The 12-Point Platform, this won't happen: College students sleeping in their cars to avoid debt

Noodling on intersectionality (more on the 1%, the 20%, and the 80%)

Still trying to learn to sketch. However, my handwriting, bad with pen and paper, is horrific with an iPad and a stylus, so herewith a digital version of the initial assumption:

Class, in other words, is "vertical"; the others are "horizontal." This is a restatement of the 80/20/1 framework discussed here. I'll try a sketch that has fewer words: Read more about Noodling on intersectionality (more on the 1%, the 20%, and the 80%)

A Post Office Bank and the Democrats (Part II)

This is the second part of a two-part post that explores the rationale for a Post Office Bank, #8 of the 12 Point Platform:

8. Post Office Bank

which I started working on because I thought it would be easy, instead of doing more work on #1: A Living Wage, which entails a definition of wage labor as a social relation. Anyhow, Part I of this post was a potted history of the Post Office, and it's good I just set the bar low there with "explores," because when I wrote Part I, I didn't yet know about Save the Post Office, and so along with a lot of other excellent material I missed these two excellent long-form backgrounders:

I don't think it will come as a surprise to anyone here that the Post Office privatizers are full of shit; what came as a surprise to me is just how full of shit they really are. Read those two pieces; you'll see too.

Part I took us all the way to 2012, where there was an interesting but all-too-temporary Post Office Bank boomlet (link, link, and link for example) touched off by this report (PDF) from the Post Office Inspector General[1] (and not, mind you, the neo-liberal infested USPS management). For our purposes, we can reduce the report to four points. From the 2014 version: Read more about A Post Office Bank and the Democrats (Part II)

With the 12-Point Platform, this won't happen: Payday loan ripoffs

[I've sworn off reacting to the news on a daily basis, because it keeps me reactive, and that's a distraction from the 12 Point Platform, which is what I really want to work on, am working on, and is a book-length effort. However, the "theory of everything" posts to back up each point take a lot of work, as chapters in books do, and the consequent absence of posting doesn't keep the hot air balloon at the altitude I prefer, i.e., not crashing into the ground. So, I'll try to react to the news at least once daily, but framing the post so that it advances the 12 Points. New editorial formula! --lambert]

Payday loans are grossly usorious. MLive:

Using names like Check 'n Go, Cash Advance and Payday Loans, there are companies throughout Detroit and beyond that specialize in immediate, high-cost, shot-term loans with interest rates often reaching 30 percent or more.*

"Michigan is one of 35 states across the country that authorizes payday lending in some form," Michigan United said in a statement Monday. "While some states and cities have worked to put a stop to predatory lending, federal laws still largely allow payday lenders to prey on vulnerable communities and benefit from borrowers' financial hardship - with annual interest rates that routinely reach 400 percent or more."

Michigan United says the industry thrives on the poor, entraps them in a "cycle of debt."....

A Google search for of payday loan centers yields nearly 70 such businesses located in Detroit, some operating 24 hours a day. Their loans are accessible online with automatic bank deposits. In-person cash loans are available at on-site locations.

Most require proof of a steady income and establishment of a bank account before loan approval

So you can imagine the problems the precariat has, let alone the System D people, or the millions without a bank account in the first place. And lest it be though the "new economy" and "big data" haven't notices, check this out from the New York Times: Read more about With the 12-Point Platform, this won't happen: Payday loan ripoffs

Obama's SOTU: What do Democrats mean by "middle class," anyhow?

I'm being triply non-linear now, because "Tax the Rich" is #3 in the Twelve Point Platform:

3. Tax the Rich

and so not only am I not beginning at the beginning with #1: A Living Wage, I'm not writing part two of my first attempt on #8: Post Office Bank, either (here is part one). Soon! Moreover, I'm reacting, albeit way too slowly, to the news, seeking to use it as a hook to raise larger issues. (These posts might be better thought of as first drafts for a book, rather than as blog posting.)

In any case: In Obama's State of the Union (SOTU) speech we have a seemingly populist tax proposal. Here is the headline summary from AP:

Obama in State of the Union: Tax wealthy, help middle class

And that's a fair summary. But there are some problems with this formulation, among them:

  1. Obama's proposals are fundamentally unserious
  2. The concept of "middle class" is hazy
  3. The unstated premise is that Federal taxes raise revenue (they don't)
  4. There are good reasons to tax the rich, even if raising revenue is not one of them
  5. We don't know how much Obama will really tax the rich
  6. Obama's proposals are unlikely to help "the middle class," however defined
  7. Concrete material benefits should be our focus, not a "tax fight"

Let's take each of these points in turn. Read more about Obama's SOTU: What do Democrats mean by "middle class," anyhow?

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