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Democrat butchers single payer talking points (for lack of party support)

A state Senate race in California:

While both support the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, the two disagreed over whether a single-payer option should be added to the program.

“I don’t have a problem with universal health care, [but] single payer doesn’t work,” [Republican Downey Councilman Mario Guerra] said. “You’re taking away choices. I want to choose my own doctor, not go to a doctor the government gives me.”

[former Assemblyman and Democrat Tony Mendoza] said, “We shouldn’t turn back now, people are suffering. It doesn’t matter what your socioeconomic status is, health care should be available to everyone.”

Total fail. Canadians get to pick their own doctor under their single payer program: Read below the fold...

Tweet of the day

This is messed up.

In the garden: Flowers after the rain

We're now in that season when rain means warmth, not coolth. So, it was warm today and the cloudy sky made for nicely saturated colors:

A tapestry (bangs head on desk seeking greater depth of field, but perhaps the iPad's lense, no matter how augmented, cannot deliver this?)

Jewel-like Bachelor's Buttons; and the iPad, for whatever reason, will show a crisper image on the screen than in the image produced; could be camera shake, so I should think of a tripod.

More Bachelor's Buttons. This is not a very good photograph, but it reminds me of a late DeKooning: Great random handing swaths of stuff, but still brilliant color. Read below the fold...

Texas Presbyterian whistleblower comes foward, shows how MBA misleadership class treated ebola nurses like cannon fodder

Really, really appalling:

[Briana Aguirre, who has worked at the Dallas hospital for three years, ] cared for nurse Nina Pham, 26, who was diagnosed with Ebola this weekend after caring for Mr Duncan, who died from Ebola last Wednesday.

Read below the fold...

In the garden: Twilight

Right as the sun was setting. Read below the fold...

Tweet of the day

The Ministry of Fear

"Quick getaway." Read below the fold...

About those coder's boot camps....

New York Times:

A new educational institution, the coding boot camp, is quietly emerging as the vocational school for the digital age, devoted to creating software developers.

These boot camps reflect the start-up ethic: small for-profit enterprises that are fast (classes are two to four months), nimble (revising curriculum to meet industry needs) and unconcerned with SAT scores or diplomas. Most are expensive, but some accept a share of the graduates’ first-year earnings or a finder’s fee from employers as payment.

Of course, some might call "a share of the graduates’ first-year earnings" indentured servitude, but what of that? No, I'm more concerned about the "start-up ethic," which is perhaps best shown in an annotated version of the photograph that accompanies the article: Read below the fold...

Tweet of the day

A good question:

Common Household Remedies Request

Can it really be true that, since now is the time to plan garlic, I can just go to the supermarket, buy a bag of garlic, and plant it? Read below the fold...

A busy day in St. Louis

I'll repeat here what I said this morning:

I should have exhaustive coverage of this, since STL > HK for local or rather continental interest, but I — and especially since the cops whacked another black kid — come away with the impression of actions that are organic, well-planned, strategic, disciplined, and in it for the long haul; it’s probably a good thing the media glare isn’t focused on STL right now. I care less about people parachuted in, especially professors of this or that. We’ll see how it goes, and especially how it goes if the grand jury doesn’t indict Darren Wilson.

So herewith a few of today's actions; looks like events at Walmart and a Steve Senger/Claire McCaskill fundraiser (ha), with a parallel event at St Louis University. I don't know enough to generalize, but I'm impressed by the general seriousness, organization, and lack of ego-flexing. Read below the fold...

The Potemkin Moment in France, 1789

If, in the French context, we mean by the "Potemkin Moment" the brief period when it became a truth universally acknowledged that the Feudal Era was so over -- that is, feudal social relations had come to an end -- July 1789 seems to be that moment (and hat tip, the Revolutions podcast 3.12, for making me see this). The Potemkin Moment was The Great Fear:omc

eom
Between June and the beginning of August there were riots in the countryside. Peasants burned their nobles' chateaux, monasteries and buildings which housed public records. They particularly targeted documents which contained records of their feudal obligations. It was called "The Great Fear" and spread quickly throughout France.

Another source (I'm trying to make up for the lack of scholarly cites with volume):

The main targets of the subsequent uprisings were the seigneurs, to whom the peasants were obliged to pay feudal dues and the corvee. The chateaux (grand homes) of the seigneurial nobility were attacked and looted (wine cellars were often the first target). Written records of names, debts and seigneurial obligations were keenly sought and quickly burnt. Sometimes the nobles themselves were held captive and, under threat, forced to renounce their rights over the peasants on the estate. The uprisings began in the south-west of France but quickly spread, reaching their peak in the last week of July. The response of the newly empowered National Assembly was to dissolve most vestiges of feudalism during its famous night-sitting of August 4. The Great Fear fizzled out a few days later, although sporadic peasant uprisings would continue throughout the revolution.

And there are more examples in Kropotkin's The Great French Revolution 1789-1793. Read below the fold...

In the garden: Busy bees

There are so many bees out at the garden today that I think what remains of my wildflowers must be a major source of nectar in the neighborhood!

Schneider 2x tele. I forget what these are; some sort of echinacea?

And now the zinnias! Read below the fold...

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