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Tweet: New document found about 2006 Guantanamo "suicides" (updated)

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Laura Poitras and Edward Snowden receive 2014 Ridenhour Prize for truth-telling (transcript)

Via live video feed:

 

Laura Poitras: Today a lot of people have talked about the risks that whistleblowers have taken and I just would like to acknowledge the impact on their families and how difficult that is, and I believe that some people in Ed’s family are here today and I just want to acknowledge the sacrifice that they’ve made.

Edward Snowden: I actually can see my father sitting in the front row there, but I didn’t want to call him out because I didn’t want to add any... Thank you for coming, I really appreciate your support. I know this has been hard for everyone, and I love you, Dad. So thank you.

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Q Munk Debate Preview - Jian Ghomeshi talks with Michael Hayden and Glenn Greenwald

Still on the Munk Debate, laying down a record. Stepping backward in time now to the morning of the debate, when both Michael Hayden and Glenn Greenwald were interviewed by Jian Ghomeshi on Q. Hayden was interviewed by phone, Greenwald was in Studio Q with Ghomeshi.

The interview with Hayden fascinates me. You know how it is when you're looking in a mirror and trying to make your hands move right but they keep going wrong, and then you just stop and stare? Read more about Q Munk Debate Preview - Jian Ghomeshi talks with Michael Hayden and Glenn Greenwald

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Edward Snowden statement at Munk Debate on State Surveillance (transcript)

Edward Snowden speaks via video at the Munk Debate on State Surveillance, May 2, 2014, in Toronto. A clip from this video was shown during the debate. This is the full video, with transcript below fold.

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Post Munk Debate Show - transcript

"First of all, I think it’s fiction that they say, “Well we only collect information on foreigners.” Who cares? The U.S. will collect information on Canadians, Canadians will collect information on Americans, and vice versa with the Five Eyes, each being each other’s eyes."

Continuing on from here, a review of the debate from a Canadian perspective. Immediately after the debate in Toronto, the conversation continued online. Hosted by Dr. Ron Deibert, Director of the Citizen Lab at the University of Toronto, and joined by Dr. Ann Cavoukian, Ontario’s Information and Privacy Commissioner, as well as Joseph Menn, Technology Projects Reporter with Thomson Reuters. Transcript below fold. Read more about Post Munk Debate Show - transcript

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Team Glenzilla vs. Creepy Unamerican Goblins - Munk Debate on State Surveillance transcript

Munk Debate on State Surveillance, last Friday, May 2nd, in Toronto. Glenn Greenwald and Alexis Ohanian versus Michael Hayden and Alan Dershowitz.

Tossing bouquets to Glenn and Alexis, thank you so much, and thanks as well to Canada and host Munk Debates.

Drinking game: First person to say "unconstitutional."

Transcript below fold. Read more about Team Glenzilla vs. Creepy Unamerican Goblins - Munk Debate on State Surveillance transcript

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Errol Morris on Abu Ghraib: "It's about us"

Errol Morris: I get tortured by stuff. I don’t have the answers. I’d like to have the answers but I don’t have them. I would get into arguments with people about Sabrina’s smile. A recurring question, “How can you get past the smile? She’s a monster. Just look at the smile.” And I would say, “But wait a second. She isn’t complicit in the murder. This is someone murdered by the CIA, and she’s taking pictures to provide evidence of a crime.”

. . .

It’s not as though I see these so-called “bad apples” as stain-free, as in no way morally compromised. I see them quite differently. But there’s a sense of outrage, and I can’t really describe it any other way.

If I look at a photograph and I’m presented with the question of why is the person who took the photograph of the crime spending time in jail and the person who committed the crime skating away, I feel a sense of outrage. I don’t know of any other way to describe it. It makes me angry. It’s outrageous. I don’t care ultimately about all the niceties of this debate. To me it comes down to something very, very simple. What kind of a country do we want to live in? What is this country about? I’m a good old-fashioned populist guy. If I see little guys taking the blame and the big guys skating away pinning medals on each other’s chest, I am outraged. I don’t know how else to describe it. It’s not politics – it’s outrageous! It’s wrong! Read more about Errol Morris on Abu Ghraib: "It's about us"

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A look back at the Guantanamo "suicides" of 2006 - Australia radio 2010

From a four-year old Australian podcast:

They claimed that the prisoners had fashioned a noose from torn sheets and T-shirts. They tied it to the top of the cell, which has an 8-foot high steel-mesh wall, that each prisoner had somehow managed to bind his hands, and in at least one case, though probably in all three, his own feet, that they had stuffed rags deep down their throat past the point of involuntary gagging, and at least two of them, but I think more likely all three, had also had masks affixed to their faces, probably to hold those rags in place. They had then stepped on top of a wash basin, affixed a noose that they had fashioned to this wall, slipped their necks through the noose, tightened it and jumped off to commit suicide, all while hands and feet were bound.

And all three simultaneously.

Transcript below the fold. Read more about A look back at the Guantanamo "suicides" of 2006 - Australia radio 2010

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Scott Horton interviews The Other Scott Horton on the White-House-CIA-torture-and-homicide complex

Other Scott Horton: Well, and conversely, Dianne Feinstein in the speech she gave, she said, you know, “This is a death of the republic sort of issue.” And that may sound melodramatic. It’s absolutely correct. Writers about these issues going back to people like Max Weber writing at the end of World War I, he said basically the test of whether a republic stands up in the modern age includes whether the Parliament, whether Congress exercises mastery over state secrecy. If they don’t do that, and then they don’t perform or discharge their oversight function, you’re not a democratic form of government. That’s the bottom line here.

Podcast here, transcript below the fold. Read more about Scott Horton interviews The Other Scott Horton on the White-House-CIA-torture-and-homicide complex

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Jonathan Landay on the CIA torture report; April 11 interview

...quote unquote "facts"...
...quote unquote "intelligence"...
...quote unquote "committed suicide"...

Well, it's the CIA. McClatchy's Jonathan Landay looks back on recent reporting on the CIA torture report and other things in this interview from April 11. Podcast here, transcript below the fold. Read more about Jonathan Landay on the CIA torture report; April 11 interview

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"People just hate us now because of this" - Reprieve's Clive Stafford Smith on Shaker Aamer's imprisonment at Gitmo

Clive Stafford Smith: Speaking as an American for a moment, one of the things that upsets me about this is around the world we’re destroying our own reputation no end bad. You know, we have a reputation, or we had a reputation around the world for standing up for human rights and being a leading beacon and all of that. And I’m afraid Guantanamo Bay in particular has just caused so many problems. I travel all over. I go to Pakistan, the Middle East and so forth, and I’m afraid people just hate us now because of this. Because they think we’re just hypocritical. And that’s not good for us. It’s not good for anyone.

Podcast here, transcript below the fold. Read more about "People just hate us now because of this" - Reprieve's Clive Stafford Smith on Shaker Aamer's imprisonment at Gitmo

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"The illusion of a court system" since 9/11 - CCR's Michael Ratner interviewed

Michael Ratner: I must say, you know, the courts have essentially taken a break from the U.S. Constitution since 9/11. We’ve lost, if you look at it, any cases to do with torture, every case to do with indefinite detention, and every case to do with drone killing, and rendition as well. ... The courts have stepped aside when allegations of torture have come in and haven’t given relief to people who have been tortured, haven’t given relief to the people still sitting in Guantanamo who we indefinitely detained, and haven’t given relief even to American citizens who have been killed by drone, and of course we’ve lost every case on rendition as well. So you can basically say the courts are not just useless, they’re worse than useless, because they give many people in America the illusion that somehow we have a court system and we’re getting rulings, but in fact they’ve upheld doctrines that before 9/11 you would have never suspected a court in the United States to uphold.

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Mr. Pascal

by Alison De Vere, 1979. Man, I hope this works. I cannot see youtubes now:

Happy Easter everyone! Read more about Mr. Pascal

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