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Congressional Districts

letsgetitdone's picture

How Voters Can Get Control of the 2012 Virginia Senate Race

The 2012 Virginia Senate race is shaping up as a contest between former Governor and Senator George F. Allen, and former Governor Tim Kaine, both establishment candidates in the legacy parties and heavily favored to win their respective nominations. They will couch their messages in terms calculated to resonate with Virginia voters. But once elected, if recent history is any guide, their legislative priorities will diverge significantly from the priorities of the voters who elect them because they will be heavily influenced by special interests that finance their campaigns. Read below the fold...

letsgetitdone's picture

2012: How U.S. Voters Can Wrest Control of Congress from Special Interests -- Part III. Why and How Congressional Elections . .

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2012: How U.S. Voters Can Wrest Control of Congress from Special Interests -- Part III. Why and How Congressional Elections Can Be Won By Transpartisan Voting Blocs in 2012

[Ed. note: This series has been re-posted by Joe Firestone (a.k.a. letsgetitdone) on behalf of author Nancy Bordier with her express permission.]

By

Nancy Bordier Read below the fold...

letsgetitdone's picture

2012: How U.S. Voters Can Wrest Control of Congress from Special Interests: A Series

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By

Nancy Bordier

The electorate's dissatisfaction with the nation's lawmakers has reached a critical stage. A majority of U.S. voters want to see most elected representatives in Congress defeated because they favor special interests over voters' interests. Unfortunately, legal obstacles erected by the two major parties prevent voters from replacing most of these representatives unless they use the revolutionary self-organizing tools described in this series to work around them.

These obstacles range from federal and state election laws to campaign finance laws and Supreme Court decisions that favor private over public funding of elections. Voters can't change these laws within the foreseeable future. But they can circumvent them at the Congressional election district level. The web savvy 125 million voters who use the Internet to influence the outcome of the 2008 elections can use new web technologies to leverage the collective action power of the Internet and elect a majority of Congressional representatives untainted by special interests in 2012. Read below the fold...

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