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Pecora Commission

Pelosi to push for Pecora Commission-style inquiry

Following through on her commitment last week at the Commonwealth Club, Pelosi moves to schedule hearings:

Wall Street may be heading for the deepest investigation of its practices since a congressional panel’s probe of abuses following the 1929 stock market crash.

Day 2 of the "Why Won't #Krugman Post On Bill Black?" Watch

From Krugman's home page at the Times:

day_1_krugman

Just sayin.

Hey, I'd settle for a Pecora commission endorsement! Read more about Day 2 of the "Why Won't #Krugman Post On Bill Black?" Watch

Day 1 of the "Why Won't #Krugman Post On Bill Black?" Watch

Come on. This story's been cooking since at least February, Hamsher's on the case, everybody who is anybody in Princeton listens to Bill Moyers, and the OFB think the story's important enough to shoot the messenger (and miss. Snicker).

And if Black is right, and accounting control fraud by the banksters is at the heart of our financial crisis, that has huge implications: Morally, legally, financially, politically. (That's why a Pecora Commission is on the "Make him do it" list.) And if he's wrong, it would really help to know that, and cross that worry off.

But Krugman's been silent. Curious, no? Read more about Day 1 of the "Why Won't #Krugman Post On Bill Black?" Watch

bringiton's picture

Pelosi vows new “Pecora-style” commission to investigate economic collapse

Speaking Wednesday at San Francisco’s Commonwealth Club, Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced that she will act next week to begin setting up an investigatory committee to examine and document what went wrong with economic policy and practices.

Pelosi stated that her decision was the result of persistent complaints from citizens about the collapse and bailout. Read more about Pelosi vows new “Pecora-style” commission to investigate economic collapse

If Obama's our FDR, then where's the Pecora Commission?

I post in haste, so Wikipedia:

The Pecora Commission is the name commonly used to describe the commission established on March 4, 1932, by the United States Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs to investigate the causes of the Wall Street Crash of 1929. The name refers to the fourth and final Chief Counsel to the committee, Ferdinand Pecora.

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