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Plantidote of the Day 2013-01-24

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Plantidote of the Day 2013-01-21

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Plantidote of the Day 2012-10-08

?

Mystery tree

A multi-trunk, 5' to 6' tall tree in bloom right now in Zone 10. The flowers look to me like members of the solanum (nightshade -- potato, eggplant, etc.) family. The flowers are about the same size as a potato vine, maybe a little bigger. But as a tree? Hmmmm, maybe not. Anyway, below the fold, you'll find a second shot with leaves that may help with identification. Also too, both images can be enlarged by clicking on them. And that's all the help you're getting from me, because I'm out of clues. Read below the fold...

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Plantidote of the Day 2012-09-21 UPDATED!

?

Limonium latifolium

Sea lavender, statice

UPDATE: This former mystery plant has been identified, thanks to jerztomato and insanely sane! And here are some links to more information:

One from the Fine Gardening website

And one from Better Homes and Gardens magazine.

******************************************************* Read below the fold...

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Plantidote of the Day 2012-09-18 UPDATED!

?

UPDATE: Thanks to insanely sane, we now know that the plant is a wisteria and what appear to be berries are actually buds. Eventually, they'll look like this.

Thanks, YesMaybe, for sending in the image!

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Whatever it is, I love it! The question is -- what are we looking at? Insectidoter YesMaybe sent in the image, wondering the same thing. Read below the fold...

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Plantidote of the Day 2012-09-03

balloon flower

Platycodon grandiflorus

Balloon flower

Maybe you're wondering why a plant with star-shaped blossoms that look nothing like balloons is called balloon flower. If so, you'll have to check below the fold and see for yourself. Ta da....! Read below the fold...

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Plantidote of the Day 2012-07-24

sea holly

Eryngium amethystinum

Sea holly, amethyst eryngium

It took more than a year for this sea holly to bloom. I bought the root online, planted it, and stared it for months, while it did ... nothing. It was looking like time to throw in the trowel. But then out of nowhere, leaves!! Followed by bristly little flowers -- lots and lots of flowers -- in the most delicious shade of blue. And there are other shades of blue available. Read below the fold...

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Plantidote of the Day 2012-07-04

lily of the nile

Agapanthus

Lily of the Nile, African lilies

As close to fireworks as the plant world gets, at least in my backyard. Happy Fourth of July, everyone! Try not blow anything up. Unless, of course, you meant to do that. Read below the fold...

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Plantidote of the Day 2012-06-11

Canary Island sage

Salvia canariensis

Canary Island sage

A big, luscious shrub for anyone Zones 8 through 10. These plants seem to bloom for months, which makes the butterflies and bees happy. They're also fragrant and easy to grow. If you have a sunny spot, this sage can easily grow as high as 7 or 8 feet tall. This one, which is in a botanical garden, is at least that big and just as wide. At some point during its blooming season, the entire bush is covered in purple flowers -- and yes, it's awesome! Read below the fold...

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Plantidote of the Day 2012-05-29

lavender calla

Zantedeschia

Calla

Everyone calls these lilies, but as I understand it, they're not. I could be wrong -- but callas are in the Araceae family, and lilies are in Liliaceae. So I'm not sure why they've been labeled lilies. Maybe someone who actually knows about these things will weigh in on the calla v. lily controversy. Read below the fold...

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Plantidote of the Day 2012-05-28

dahlia

Dahlia (botanical name and common name are the same)

Fresh from the garden store, a Memorial Day dahlia. Enjoy! The longer, more irreverent -- or is it irrelevant? -- Plantidote will return tomorrow. Read below the fold...

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Plantidote of the Day 2012-05-07

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Plantidote of the Day 2012-04-17

hyacinth

Hyacinthus orientalis

Common hyacinth

Natives of Turkey, hyacinths were discovered by the Dutch a few hundred years ago and hybridized into something like 2,000 different cultivars. (When it comes to flowers, the Dutch don't mess around.) Who can blame them? The fragrance alone is worth it. Then there are the colors. Read below the fold...

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Plantidote of the Day 2012-04-10

spring bouquet

Spring bouquet

I must be getting old. When I shot this a couple days ago, I knew the name of the red and bright pink flowers. Now I can't remember what it is. (The little purple ones are pansies -- even I know that!)

So please do me a favor -- some flower/garden person who still has functioning brain cells, throw me a bone and tell me what it is, so I can write up the details. Assuming I don't forget, of course ;-)

*************************************************** Read below the fold...

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Plantidote of the Day 2012-04-09

?

Mystery plant

I'm fairly certain this is a succulent of some sort. At least, it sure looks like one (see image below for a better view of the plant itself). But that flower! I actually did a double take, because I've never seen a flower like that on a succulent. It looks like an anemone. But wait, it gets weirder! Read below the fold...

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