Corrente

If you have "no place to go," come here!

activism

danps's picture

Commissioners pipeline meeting: strategy and why it's worth the bother

Thoughts on how to approach public events, and why to do so even if the prospects for success don't look good.

Cross posted from Pruning Shears. Read below the fold...

metamars's picture

Prequel #1 to OccupyPublicSpaces.org debut: “The Walk” and “the universe was speaking to me”

The following diary was originally posted, over a year ago, at Firedoglake, under the title

Prequel #1 to OccupyTheSidewalk.org debut: “The Walk” and “the universe was speaking to me”

Read below the fold...
danps's picture

18th century political thinking in the 21st

Some prefer to treat political reality as a large and fixed quantity, but that ignores what can happen at a smaller scale.

Cross posted from Pruning Shears. Read below the fold...

danps's picture

Don't Frack Ohio starting this weekend: three days of education and activism

With two days of training on the weekend and a rally on Monday, Ohioans are gathering to protest fracking.

Cross posted from Pruning Shears.

Activists across Ohio are preparing for a weekend of activities in the northeast part of the state. On Saturday and Sunday, July 27th and 28th, at the First Congregational Church in Ravenna, there will be two days of trainings designed to give us the tools we can use to build a powerful movement that will achieve our right to clean air and water and democracy. At the "Don't Frack Ohio 2" Rally in Warren on July 29th we will tell our policymakers that we do not want to be a fracking wasteland. Music and info at 11:30 and the rally starts at 1:30 at the Trumbull County Courthouse in Warren.


The post below was originally submitted as a leeter to the editor of the Record Courier. Read below the fold...

danps's picture

"You quickly realize that no one is there for you but you know who? You. That's all you have."

One of the under appreciated hazards of fracking is its effect on democracy. Fracking is a big, intrusive process - one that sucks up lots of water, creates enormous amounts of traffic and an ungodly amount of noise, etc. Setting aside the environmental dangers and health effects (!), the heavy industrialization involved in fracking guarantees that communities will be abundantly aware of it. Read below the fold...

danps's picture

Communities rally against toxic fracking waste

On Wednesday communities held Freedom From Toxic Fracking Waste rallies to raise awareness on one of the largest environmental risks from fracking: dealing with the waste it produces. Read below the fold...

danps's picture

Fighting fracking: introverts edition

One of the biggest threats fracking poses to the environment is the way it endangers the water supply. It does so in several ways, one of which has large-scale implications. Global impact like that is a little unusual; environmental issues are more likely to be local. Whether it's fracking, lead paint/asbestos in old buildings, or a Superfund site, once you get a few miles away from it the greatest hazard is usually mitigated.

Fracking permanently removes water from the hydrological cycle, though, at which point it may as well be on the far side of the moon for as much use as it is. This goes beyond competition for scarce resources during a dry season, though the oil and gas industry is well positioned to elbow everyone else aside (via) if it comes to that. It is about the slow draining of the amount of water available for human use. Read below the fold...

danps's picture

Hiram residents attempt to ask questions about fracking

Thursday's post on Hiram's public fracking meeting mainly covered residents' interaction with local officials. The bigger part of the meeting, though, featured two speakers with ties to the oil and gas industry. Read below the fold...

danps's picture

'Nuns on the Bus' passes through Cleveland

On June 17th the Catholic social justice lobbying group NETWORK launched a 15 day Nuns on the Bus tour. (As befits their budding rock star status, they are selling a tour shirt as well.) They are speaking out against the House Republican budget because, as they write: "When the federal government cuts funding to programs that serve people in poverty, we see the effects in our daily work. Simply put, real people suffer. That is immoral." Read below the fold...

danps's picture

The Wisconsin recall: myths and talking points

Part 1.

Part 2.

Yesterday I looked at Bruce Murphy's article about the Wisconsin recall, and how Murphy thought Democrats and unions brought defeat on themselves. There is one point he made that fits in with a purely political analysis, which is what I'm focusing on today. He writes: "Had Tom Barrett — or any Democrat — offered an alternative, some approach that would eliminate the abuse of public benefits without crushing unions, while protecting the many public workers who are not overpaid, this could have carried the day against Walker." Read below the fold...

danps's picture

The Wisconsin recall: how the movement could have helped

Part 1.

Since the recall was run as a conventional political campaign, instead of one grounded in the turmoil of last year, it's fair to ask how the latter might have looked. Doug Henwood offered these thoughts:

Suppose instead that the unions had supported a popular campaign - media, door knocking, phone calling - to agitate, educate, and organize on the importance of the labor movement to the maintenance of living standards? If they'd made an argument, broadly and repeatedly, that Walker's agenda was an attack on the wages and benefits of the majority of the population? That it was designed to remove organized opposition to the power of right-wing money in politics? That would have been more fruitful than this major defeat.

It seemed like the Barrett campaign never bothered to make the case for unions in general or collective bargaining in particular. I kept thinking, did last winter just go down the memory hole? Why isn't anyone bringing up the unjust law that was the catalyst for all this? Read below the fold...

danps's picture

The Wisconsin recall: a movement sidelined

With a hat tip to MontanaMaven, and I hope I'm not bigfooting the post. Read below the fold...

LostClown's picture

Don't Dis My Ability Zine fundraiser

Kickstarter here PLEASE support this - these words need to get out and everyone who's read it LOVES it. I just have no more money to make any copies other then the ones that are already made.

A reminder of what you are supporting:

I will use the funds to make copies and distribute the zine far and wide. I want to put it in every info shop (activist bookstore) around North America and possibly every English speaking country around the world. This zine includes:

42 pages of awesome (plus cover)

Images by basiL, billie rain, J.C. Garske, Leslie Balch & Sasha Smithy, Jessie, Burrow, & Sadie Sicko

POEMS:

Helium by Kristin Allen-Zito

Art Viewing by J.C. Garske Read below the fold...

LostClown's picture

Disability zine distro chipin

You can read about the zine and how to order one here and the chipin is here.

Help me get this thing distroed! Read below the fold...

LostClown's picture

Disability Zine now out (with activism)

11 sheets of paper (double sided and 2 pages per sheet)

8 articles

7 images on their own pages

2 nights NO SLEEP.

PRICELESS

Disability Zine nitty gritty:


42 pages of awesome (plus cover)

Images by basiL, billie rain, Jessie, Leslie Balch & Sasha Smithy, Amy @ amycakes.blogspot.com, & Sadie Sicko

POEMS:

Helium by Kristin Allen-Zito

Art Viewing by Jessie

Untitled by Trouble

ARTICLES: Read below the fold...

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - activism