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Extend the gardening season

For those of us gardening in northern climes, the growing season is always too short. We wait and wait and wait until it's safe to put out tender, tropicals like tomatoes and then keep our fingers crossed that we won't be set back by a late frost. Those late plantings mean we enter the early fall with an abundant but unripened crop, so again we cross our fingers and pray that we won't be hurt by an early frost. Read more about Extend the gardening season

twig's picture

Plantidote of the Day 2011-09-29

brussels sprouts

Brassica oleracea

Brussels sprouts

A relative of cabbage, cauliflower and broccoli, Brussels sprouts are one of the unsung joys of the vegetable kingdom. First, growing in the garden, they look like something from a Dr. Seuss book. Second, they are absolutely delicious. Third, they're full of nutrients, including glucosinolates, the same compounds that made broccoli famous. Four, they have a fairly decent shelf life in the refrigerator, unlike some veggies. Read more about Plantidote of the Day 2011-09-29

Kathryn's picture

Plantidote of the Day 2011-08-17

Tulip Trees

Liriodendron tulipifera
Tulip Trees at Monticello

In the image above, the two enormous trees that flank the front of Thomas Jefferson's Monticello are Liriodendrons. If you look at the tree on the right, and then just towards the house, and you make the image as big as possible, you will see a person standing there. Just to give yourself an idea of scale.

Image is courtesy member insanelysane, who writes: Read more about Plantidote of the Day 2011-08-17

Kathryn's picture

Plantidote of the Day 2011-08-10

Water Lily

Water Lily

Nymphaeaceae

This exquisite image of a water lily comes to us from Valley Girl. She writes: “I am attaching something for possible plantidote. Pond lily / water lily from the wee pond in my condo patio. “

Ok, I want one; the water lily and the mini-pond. VG – can we have a pic of the pond too? How does that work? Is it an aquariam cultivar? Read more about Plantidote of the Day 2011-08-10

Kathryn's picture

Plantidote of the Day 2011-08-03

Fountain Grass

Pennisetum alopecuroides

Fountain Grass

I really like ornamental grasses. I have absolutely no idea what any of them are and am notorious for bringing them home unlabeled. But these are one of my late summer lovelies.

Here’s a wider view on this one. Anyone have any idea? It’s full sun, nicely compact and clumped. I just call them all “Fountain Grass” because they are so graceful in the wind, and that’s what my dad called them. All. Read more about Plantidote of the Day 2011-08-03

Kathryn's picture

Plantidote of the Day 2011-07-27

Day Lily

Daylily
Hemerocallis

With many thanks to Andre we have this beautiful image of Daylilies (with a shout out to the hostas in the background). Andre wrote to us about them: Read more about Plantidote of the Day 2011-07-27

twig's picture

Plantidote of the Day 2011-07-18

garlic

Allium sativum

Artichoke garlic (Early Red Italian)

My first garlic harvest! The "seed" that sprouted into these bulbs was purchased after reading an article about growing specialty garlic. It turns out that all garlic is not created equal. There are strains available from all over the world, and each one has a somewhat different flavor and sometimes appearance. Read more about Plantidote of the Day 2011-07-18

Kathryn's picture

Plantidote of the Day 2011-07-13

Mountain Hydrangea

Mountain Hydrangea
Hydrangea serrata

This is a hydrangea, and I believe it is a cultivar of Mountain Hydrangea. It is native to mountainous areas in Asia and requires rich, well drained soil, decently moist, and partial shade. There is some debate about whether or not Hydrangea serrata is its own species or a sub-species of the larger, more common bigleaf hydrangea (H. macrophylla/mophead). It is much more compact than the macrophylla, at 2-4ft, and hardy to zone 6. Read more about Plantidote of the Day 2011-07-13

Kathryn's picture

Plantidote of the Day 2011-06-29

Acanthus

Bear’s Breeches
[Edit 02/29/12: Acanthus spinosus (Spiny Bear’s Breeches) per RU]

I found these in a shady area, tucked away by a Gazebo at Rutgers Gardens. They are about 5’ tall and just stunning, from the marvelous leaves to the tall bracts that are currently in flower. Read more about Plantidote of the Day 2011-06-29

Kathryn's picture

Plantidote of the Day 2011-06-22

Scarlet Bee Balm

Monarda didyma
Scarlet Bee Balm

So the theme this week is “Summer Solstice.” Read more about Plantidote of the Day 2011-06-22

Kathryn's picture

Plantidote of the Day 2011-06-15

Evergreen Candytuft

Evergreen Candytuft
Iberis sempervirens

This is the perennial, evergreen form of Candytuft, a great mounding plant around 12” in height and 2’ wide. It can grow in almost any conditions, partial shade to full sun, blooms strongest in full sun, and should be mulched for winter in Northern climes. It is best to cut Candytuft back after flowering as it will set more buds on summer growth for the next year. Read more about Plantidote of the Day 2011-06-15

Kathryn's picture

Plantidote of the Day 2011-06-08

Persian Shield

Storbilanthes dyerianus

Persian Shield

This is one of those plants that I have an obsession with. And no matter where I’ve planted it -- Kansas, Texas, Florida, New Jersey – it just dies. But I keep trying!

Persian Shield is a low growing sub-shrub native to Myanmar. The leaves are the most amazing iridescent purple and green, and when new leaves sprout they have a nice silver sheen to them. It is upright growing to about 4’ with a 2-3’ spread. Read more about Plantidote of the Day 2011-06-08

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