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twig's picture

Plantidote of the Day 2011-04-19

TK

Cherry blossoms in Japan

It's sakura(cherry blossom) season in Japan. Actually, cherry trees everywhere are likely to be in bloom. But the flowers are important symbols in Japanese culture and it must be somewhat comforting to continue rituals celebrating nature and beauty during the current crisis. Read below the fold...

twig's picture

Plantidote of the Day 2011-03-15

cherry blossoms

Prunus serrulata

Japanese flowering cherry blossoms

Cherry blossoms symbolize both the ephemeral nature of beauty and life as well as good fortune in the future. These blossoms are for the people of Japan, as they face one of the worst disasters imaginable. Deepest condolences. Our thoughts are with you.

Fellow flickrer Focx Photography very kindly gave me permission to reproduce this image, shot in his neighborhood in Nagoya. Thank you so much!

------- Read below the fold...

Seeking Info Re Health Safety Issues In Tokyo and Japan

I have a niece who is going to school in Tokyo for this year but is home in the states on a semester break for a few weeks. She was going to go back to Japan early next week, though has more weeks before school resumes. Should she postpone going back until more is known? What exactly is known right now re the reactor danger? I intend to do some serious googling, and am ashamed I have not been more on top of this story and want to be since it strikes so close to home.

Anybody know some reliable info or the source of some reliable info?

Thanks for any consideration. Read below the fold...

DCblogger's picture

What pragmatism looks like

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The death toll in Japan would have been far higher save for their strict building codes and sea wall.

It is amazing what humans can do if they are not restrained by ideology or parasitic overlords. Read below the fold...

letsgetitdone's picture

Fairy Tales of the Coming State of the Union: Fairy Tales and Truths

Thread: 

In "All Together Now: There Is No Deficit/Debt Problem,” I warned against the message calling for deficit reduction that the President will probably deliver in his State of the Union Address next month. I view the coming narrative as very likely to be composed of a number of fairy tales. In previous posts in this series I've analyzed and critiqued seven of the fairy tales I expect the President to tell us in his coming State of the Union speech. Read below the fold...

letsgetitdone's picture

Fairy Tales of the Coming State of the Union: Our Grandchildren Must Have the Burden of Repaying the National Debt

Thread: 

In "All Together Now: There Is No Deficit/Debt Problem,” I warned against the message calling for deficit reduction that the President will probably deliver in his State of the Union Address next month. I view the coming narrative as very likely to be composed of a number of fairy tales. In previous posts in this series I've analyzed and critiqued six of the fairy tales I expect the President to tell us in his coming State of the Union speech. In this post, I'll discuss a seventh fairy tale: the idea that our grandchildren must have the heavy burden of repaying our national debt.

Let's begin with a little history, only once, in the history of the Republic has the United States fully repaid that national debt, and that was in 1835, when Andrew Jackson's second Administration paid off the debt. That pay-off and the further attempt to establish a fund that would compensate for future deficits was followed by the one of the worst depressions in American history in 1837. That depression brought back the deficit and the national debt, and though the Government has sometimes run surpluses since then, it has never again paid off the national debt. Read below the fold...

letsgetitdone's picture

Fairy Tales of the Coming State of the Union: If We Keep Issuing Debt Our Main Creditors Won't Buy It

Thread: 

In "All Together Now: There Is No Deficit/Debt Problem,” I warned against the message calling for deficit reduction that the President will probably deliver in his State of the Union Address next month. I view the coming narrative as very likely to be composed of a number of fairy tales. In previous posts in this series I've analyzed and critiqued five of the fairy tales I expect the President to tell us in his coming State of the Union speech. Read below the fold...

letsgetitdone's picture

Loose Talk and Numbskull Notions At the Podesta/Holtz-Eakin Debate: Part One

Tuesday night, I thought I'd attend The National Journal's Debate on "Our Fiscal Future" between John Podesta and Douglas Holtz-Eakin with Jim Tankersley moderating at The George Washington University's Marvin Center. I was interested because Podesta is often thought to be on the left-wing of “mainstream” opinion, and also it is said that he is one of the leading possibilities to succeed Rahm Emanuel as the President's Chief of Staff. So, I wanted to see if I could find some glimmer of novelty in the point of view he expressed; some indication that he might bring some new thinking into The White House beyond what Obama has been hearing from say, Austan Goolsbee. Read below the fold...

letsgetitdone's picture

G20 Says Expansionary Fiscal Policy Not Sustainable

By

Warren Mosler

With permission of the author

The G20 has dropped its support for fiscal expansion. The deficit hawks are prevailing. But why is that? We all either know or should know that operationally Federal spending is not constrained by revenues, as Chairman Bernanke stated last year, when asked on '60 Minutes' by Scott Pelley where the funds given to the banks came from:

"...we simply use the computer to mark up the size of the account that they have with the Fed."

We know that when the Fed spends on behalf of the Treasury it simply credits a member bank or foreign government's reserve account at the Fed. Read below the fold...

letsgetitdone's picture

Part of the Problem

By

Warren Mosler and Joseph M. Firestone

Paul Krugman agrees that “We're Not Greece.” But he only appears to have a glimmer of an understanding of the most important reason why this is so. We hope this commentary on his op-ed piece improves his understanding, and that of other deficit doves who appear to disagree with the deficit terrorists, but who in the end share their false basic assumptions about deficits, national debts, fiscal responsibility, and fiscal sustainability.

It’s an ill wind that blows nobody good, and the crisis in Greece is making some people — people who opposed health care reform and are itching for an excuse to dismantle Social Security — very, very happy. Everywhere you look there are editorials and commentaries, some posing as objective reporting, asserting that Greece today will be America tomorrow unless we abandon all that nonsense about taking care of those in need.

Read below the fold...
DCblogger's picture

Health care fear mongering

How do we know that we are making progress? Op-eds that demonize single payer. They would not place these articles if they didn't think that they needed them.

Paul Hsieh has a fear mongering article in the Christian Science Monitor. Do we all understand why the Christian Science Monitor is not a good source on anything connected to health care?

Sedalia, Colo. - Imagine a country where the government regularly checks the waistlines of citizens over age 40. Anyone deemed too fat would be required to undergo diet counseling. Those who fail to lose sufficient weight could face further "reeducation" and their communities subject to stiff fines.

Is this some nightmarish dystopia?

Read below the fold...
chicago dyke's picture

Save the Whales, Eat the Children

So the Japanese are forcing whale meat on kids, calling it "traditional foods week" in schools. Nevermind that the Japanese rejected whalemeat as too poisoned previously, or that Norway tells pregnant women to avoid it. This is what people will do for ideology: kill the endangered to poison their own children. Read below the fold...

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