Corrente

If you have "no place to go," come here!

What the world needs is more studies of cats

Scientific American:

Where do cats go when they are lurking out of sight? The question is of interest not just to pet owners but also to conservation scientists who study the impact of free-roaming cats on wildlife populations. Scientists at the University of Illinois and the Illinois Natural History Survey recently attached radio transmitters to the adjustable collars of 18 pet and 24 feral cats in southeastern Champaign-Urbana and tracked the animals by truck and on foot for more than one year. The research, published in the Journal of Wildlife Management, shows that pet cats maintain a rather lazy existence: they spent 80 percent of their time resting.

Shocker!

They devoted another 17 percent to low-activity pursuits such as grooming and only 3 percent to high-activity pursuits such as hunting. Unowned cats rested just 62 percent of the time and spent 14 percent, mostly at night, being highly active. Feral cats roamed far more widely than researchers had expected: up to 1,351 acres. In contrast, pet cats stayed within an average of about five acres of home.

Like feral former Democrats....

0
No votes yet

Comments

Submitted by jawbone on

...[P]et cats maintain a rather lazy existence: they spent 80 percent of their time resting. They devoted another 17 percent to low-activity pursuits such as grooming and only 3 percent to high-activity pursuits such as hunting. Unowned cats rested just 62 percent of the time and spent 14 percent, mostly at night, being highly active. Feral cats roamed far more widely than researchers had expected: up to 1,351 acres. In contrast, pet cats stayed within an average of about five acres of home.

Clearly, the researchers did not include the time spent by pet cats pawing their owners' faces to wake them, meowing or caterwauling for food, then food of their choice. That surely would have upped the high- and low-activity percentages for the pets.

(So nice to have a post to smile about...and it's not even Friday.)

bdr's picture
Submitted by bdr on

is love sweet love. It's the only thing that's there's just too little of.

You put the song in my head. Be in yours. Good thing.

chicago dyke's picture
Submitted by chicago dyke on

i've owned cats all my life. mine, currently, only go outside and only around the house, with me when i'm in the garden. which is a lot. they've killed a not insignificant number of voles and other little critters just in that small time; i just found another one with a head crushed in the other day. all my family cats have been true predators. imho, it depends on where you live. if you're in an urban area and all there is to hunt is smart urban rats, sure. they're not hunting all the time. but a lush rural area with birds, critters and squirrels? or even an suburban environment like mine? no, they're hunting. they live for it. my previous cat would bring baby birds down from trees, and chipmunks from the woodpile. and lay them at the doorstep, with a big, catty grin that said, "here! have some! it's tasty." like, weekly and sometimes, daily.

illusionofjoy's picture
Submitted by illusionofjoy on

All of my life I've had indoor cats as I worry about letting domesticated pets roam wild. Not so much for what nature threatens, but because it is my experience that people do horrible things to cats who aren't protected inside of a house.

Even so, the hunting instinct remains. Mice and such tend to avoid a house with a cat even if it does provide shelter for the rodent. It's as if they get in and, assuming they get back out alive, tell all of their mousey friends that the risk isn't worth it. So, my housecats' quarry is generally limited to flies, moths and - up until recently (thank goodness) - stink bugs. I could give them all the jingle toys in the world and they still prefer to chase after something alive.

Turlock